Bradley’s Iron Foundry, Northgate

KSCN0006_sT & W Bradley at the Wellington Foundry, Northgate, Newark. Thomas Bradley took over the Wellington (iron) Foundry on Northgate in Newark in 1874. For information on the Wellington Foundry prior to Bradley’s acquisition, click HERE

T. Bradley at the Wellington Foundry ("Late Midworth & Co."). From the Newark Advertiser 10th January 1877 p6 c5

T. Bradley at the Wellington Foundry (“Late Midworth & Co.”). From the Newark Advertiser 10th January 1877 p6 c5

In 1876, or some time soon after, Thomas was joined in the business by his younger brother, William, the business being thereafter styled T & W Bradley.

Thomas Bradley is listed as living at Wellington House, Northgate, whilst William resided in Victoria Street.

Thomas Bradley

Thomas Bradley

William Bradley

William Bradley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There survive ‘Articles of Agreement’ dated 20th May 1879 between Thomas and William Bradley whereby they agree to trade as partners until 1884 (5 years) at the Wellington foundry.  William was to pay Thomas £1,300, with subsequent profits to be divided three quarters to   Thomas, and one quarter to William (NAO DDH.149/137).

1882 the Bradleys spent £1,000 on rebuilding etc. at the Wellington foundry, taking the lease of the same for 40 years at £80pa (NAO DDH.149/138).

 

Cover of Order of Service for the funeral of William Bradley, 3rd August 1927

Cover of Order of Service for the funeral of William Bradley, 3rd August 1927

In its edition of 21st February 1883 (p5 c6) the Newark Advertiser reported that the Bradleys had accepted the tender of Mr. Crosland of Newark (£645-1-6) for erecting new warehouses and offices at the foundry.  Subcontracts were taken by Messrs. Dobney (joinery), Thrale (stone masonry), Bousfield (plumbing and glazing), Crossley (painting) and Dobbs (slating).

The architect was R.W.G. Hayward of Newark who designed a wooden roof in one span to cover the 84′ x 50′ warehouse.

In 1885, the Newark Advertiser (4th March 1885 p5 c4) reported on the successful tender of Smith & Lunn (£72-12-0) to erect a 60ft high chimney at the Wellington foundry, the architect being George Sheppard.

Thomas Bradley died in 1921, the business having been merged a little while earlier with the Lincoln firm of engineers, Messrs Ruston & Hornsby.  William died six years later in 1927.

Rainwater gulley cover by T & W Bradley.  Still in use on Barnbygate, Newark when photographed in January 2017

Rainwater gulley cover by T & W Bradley. Still in use on Barnbygate, Newark when photographed in January 2017